September 24, 2017

Father claims drug made him gambling gay sex addict

Tired of your sexual orientation, being well behaved and prudent with money? We have just the drug for you.

Frenchman Didier Jambart, is taking British drug giant GlaxoSmithKline to court, alleging their Requip drug used to treat Parkinson’s disease, turned him into a gay sex and gambling addict.

The mans lawyers say their client’s behaviour changed radically after he was first prescribed the drug in 2003 for the debilitating illness, which causes tremors, disrupts speech and slows movement.

Jambart, 51, a married father-of-two says he has attempted suicide three times, claims he became addicted to internet gambling, losing the family’s savings and stealing to feed his habit.

But wait there’s more. He also claims he became a compulsive gay sex addict and began exposing himself on the internet and cross-dressing. His lawyers claim his risky sexual encounters led to him being raped.

Jambart claims this behaviour stopped when he stopped taking the drugs in 2005 but by then he had been demoted in his defence ministry job and was suffering from psychological trauma resulting from his addictions.

His lawyers are seeking a total of $618,000 in damages from Glaxo, which he accuses of selling a “defective” drug, and from his neurologist for having failed to properly inform him about the drug.

The lawyers go on to say that the drug has been known for years to have undesired side effects but a warning only appeared on its package insert in 2006.

The most bizarre thing about this case is that the guy is not an American. This all sounds more like one of those “and now the latest nutty story from America” tales.

Even if he wins Newswarped wonders if Jambart will have much money left over after he has paid his lawyers.

Apparently lawyers all over the world are waiting for the outcome of this case and are preparing to launch class actions of their own against drugs companies selling the dopamine agonist type drugs for Parkinson’s treatment.

It sounds like the drugs companies were big on profit, but not too big on providing details to patients about potential side effects. It is no wonder. Imagine having to put ‘may result in gambling and sex addictions of all kinds’. It is hardly a winning marketing ploy. I guess in some sections of society it might go down well though.

Comments

  1. Very interesting article. Drugs can have serious side effects. This is great resource for information on defective medications: http://www.weitzlux.com/dangerous-medicines-medical-devices_1962444.html