November 23, 2017

Microsoft security flaw affects 900 million users

Yay free patches for everyone - thanks Microsoft for drawing the hackers attention to the Windows flaw.

Microsoft has issued a “critical” warning over a newly-discovered flaw in Windows.

The software giant has issued a security advisory warning of a loophole that could be used by malicious hackers to steal private information or hijack computers. Newswarped would like to point out that we know what you are thinking and it is not Google they are talking about.

The flaw is in Windows itself but only seems to be a problem when the Internet Explorer web browser is being used. There are estimated to be 900 million Internet Explorer users on the planet and several million more on Mars.

Microsoft has issued a software patch to defend against attacks, and said it was working to develop a long-term fix, which is jolly decent of them really.

Microsoft admitted that the problem meant users could easily be fooled into downloading malicious files by doing something as simple as clicking on a web link.

“When the user clicked that link, the malicious script would run on the user’s computer for the rest of the current Internet Explorer session,” wrote Microsoft representative Angela Gunn in a website announcement accompanying the advisory. ‘Angela’s Advisory’ – has a nice ring to it doesn’t it. Much better than ‘Bill’s Balls-up’.

Once a computer had been hijacked, hackers could use it to steal personal data or send users to fake websites, Angela added.

“Such a script might collect user information, e.g e-mail, spoof content displayed in the browser or otherwise interfere with the user’s experience.” Yeah like it could be a really bad trip for the users out there.

Although Microsoft said it had seen no evidence that the glitch had already been exploited by hackers, it warned that research had shown it was a serious threat. That sounds more like some of the scare mongering that comes out of Homeland Security on a regular basis.

Microsoft has not been able to remove the bug in Windows itself, but has issued a “fix it” security patch to block any attempts to use it.

All Windows users – particularly those who use Internet Explorer – are being urged to download the fix while the company’s security team develop a way to plug the hole permanently. Paranoid conspiracy theorists are also advised that the patch is indeed a malicious virus that has origins in a secret government project but they shouldn’t be alarmed.